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Celebrate Banned Book week next week and read a banned book!

What do Chris Crutcher, Toni Morrison, John Steinbeck, Judy Blume, Philip Pulman, Mark Twain, J. K. Rowling, and J.D. Salinger have in common?

They all have the distinction of appearing on the list of "Most frequently challenged authors of the 21st century". The American Library Association and other organizations designate a week every year to celebrate the freedom to read.  Celebrate Banned Book week from September 25-October 2, 2010. Read more about the week at http://www.ala.org/ala/issuesadvocacy/banned/bannedbooksweek/index.cfm and read a banned or challenged book this week!


Need Help Identifying Banned or Challenged Books?

The Lovely Bones, Of Mice and Men, The Chocolate War, I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings, The Perks of Being a Wallflower, Forever, The Color Purple, And Tango Makes Three, The Handmaid’s Tale, To Kill a Mockingbird, The Kite Runner, Snow Falling on Cedars, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn – what do all of these books have in common? All of them were among the most commonly challenged or banned books – the targets of efforts to remove them from library collections or school reading lists - in the decade from 2000 – 2009.

Each September, the American Library Association highlights the importance of the freedom to read and of open access to information by drawing attention to the challenging and banning of books across the country during Banned Books Week.

For more information about Banned Books Week, and to view lists of challenged and banned titles, visit the American Library Association Banned Books Week web page at http://www.ala.org/ala/issuesadvocacy/banned/bannedbooksweek/index.cfm.


Grants Database Now Available

This blurb from the Rod Library News blog explains a new grants database: Are You Seeking Grants to Help Fund Programs? The university has a new grants database called The Foundation Directory Online accessible through the library website 24/7 from any location. Off-campus users will be prompted for their CatID. The Foundation Center, a leading authority on organized philanthropy, produces the database which contains information about nearly 100,000 foundations, corporate donors, and grantmaking public charities in the U.S. and 2.1 million recently awarded grants. The database includes: •Detailed information about grantmakers •Types of programs/activities grantmakers will support •Application process and links to 990 tax forms •Lists of organizations that have received money from grantmakers •Recipients of grants located in geographic location (i.e., Waterloo, IA) To get to the database from the Rod Library home page, click on the Databases A - Z link located under the Articles tab and scroll down the alphabetical list of databases. Next, click on the title to enter the database. The direct link to the database is The Foundation Directory Online database is funded jointly by three campus units: Rod Library, Office of Sponsored Programs, and the UNI Foundation. Submitted by neuhaus_e


Foundation Directory Online Database

Are You Seeking Grants to Help Fund Programs?

The university has a new grants database called The Foundation Directory Online accessible through the library website 24/7 from any location.   Off-campus users will be prompted for their CatID.

The Foundation Center, a leading authority on organized philanthropy, produces the database which contains information about nearly 100,000 foundations, corporate donors, and grantmaking public charities in the U.S. and 2.1 million recently awarded grants.  The database includes:

  • Detailed information about grantmakers
  • Types of programs/activities grantmakers will support
  • Application process and links to 990 tax forms
  • Lists of organizations that have received money from grantmakers
  • Recipients of grants located in geographic location (i.e., Waterloo, IA)

To get to the database from the Rod Library home page, click on the Databases A - Z link located under the Articles tab and scroll down the alphabetical list of databases.  Next, click on the title to enter the database.  The direct link to the database is https://login.proxy.lib.uni.edu/login?url=http://fconline.foundationcenter.org/ipl.php.

The Foundation Directory Online database is funded jointly by three campus units: Rod Library, Office of Sponsored Programs, and the UNI Foundation.

 


Three Ways to Find Journal Articles

View more Rod Library YouTube videos at Rod Library Video Playlist.


New Books in High Use and Interest Areas Now Available

With the support of an allocation of $20,000 in ARRA (American Recovery and Investment Act) funds received in spring 2010, the Library has acquired almost 600 recently published books in areas of high use and on current topics of interest.  Most of these titles have been added to the circulating  Stacks collection.  The selections include recent award winners in fiction, poetry, and non-fiction.  These titles focus on such subjects as digital technologies, diversity, global warming, Islam, multiculturalism, sustainability, and women's and gender studies.  A number of books also have been acquired for the Youth Collection.  To identify titles of potential interest, you may want to conduct keyword or subject searches against the online catalog, or browse the New Titles list on the Library web site at http://www.library.uni.edu/gateway/newtitle/


Labor Day Weekend Hours

The Library will be open the following hours this weekend. Have a great Labor Day!

September 3 Friday    7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.
September 4 Saturday    12:00 noon - 5:00 p.m.
September 5 Sunday    12:00 noon - 5:00 p.m.
September 6 Monday (Labor Day) 6:00 p.m. - 12:00 midnight

 


Cedar Valley Hunger Games II Information and Registration

For more information about the Cedar Valley Hunger Games II, click here.  You will find a flyer, the registration and rules, and a release form for the Hunger Games II.  You can also view a video from last year's Hunger Games.  The Hunger Games II will be held on Saturday, October 16th, 2010.  Registration and release forms are due October 1st, 2010. 


Rod Library & Hunger Games featured in Des Moines Register

Today's Des Moines Register featured Rod Library and the Cedar Valley Hunger Games that were held last fall. Click here to view the article.


University Archives and Special Collections Exhibits

Come and Visit University Archives and Special Collections located on the 3rd floor in Rod Library.

Study Abroad … See the World

Prepared by: Kim Nurre

Students started studying abroad on their own in 1896. John Kleinsorge and W. R. Patterson were two of the first students to Study Abroad.

President Seerley was on a board that recommended teachers to study abroad.
Education Travel Division was created in 1940 to assist students and faculty with studying abroad.

In 1952, other countries started giving grants to American students to study abroad. A year later the senate endorsed the first study tour to Europe.

In 2002, UNI was ranked by the Institute of International Education as fourth in the nation for number of students studying abroad for Master’s Degrees.

Student Arrival … Over the Years
Prepared by: David Glime

Transportation problems at the University today involve parking space. In 1876, when Iowa State Normal School first opened, the city of Cedar Falls was five miles from Campus. Students either had to walk on dirt of “mud” sidewalks or pay someone with a horse and buggy to get to campus. Sometimes students needed to hitch a ride.

An electric street car system was proposed to run between Waterloo, Cedar Falls, and Campus in 1892. It took until 1897 for operation to begin.

The advent of the automobile changed the way students arrive. Help from family was a necessity no matter what the time period. Families now pack student possessions in livestock trailers, grain trucks, pickups, U-Haul’s, and cars. No matter how you arrived on campus this fall…
Welcome Back!

Great Things Come in Small Packages
Prepared by: Amy Yates

Have you ever noticed how many small books are in the library? University Archives and Special Collections has many small books including the following:

  • Children’s Lyceum Manual: With Directions For Children’s Progressive Lyceums, Adapted to the bodies and minds of the Young; containing rules, marches, lessons, envocations, Silver-chain recitations, hymns, and songs. By: Andrew Jackson Davis. Printed in 1867.
  • The Complaint: or, Night Thoughts, by Edward Young, D. D. [printed in the 1800’s]
  • A Sketch of My Friend’s Family: suggesting hints on Religion and Domestic Manners, By: Mrs. Marshall. Printed in 1822.
  • Melodies, songs, sacred songs, and national airs: containing several never before published in America. By: Thomas Moore, esq. Printed in 1836

The following book is written in Russian translated into English and German:

  • Mtsyri = Der Mziri; By: Mikhail Lermontov (1814-1841). Printed in 1993.

Another Russian book:

  •  Epigrammy. By: Aleksandr Sergeevich Pushkin (1799-1837). Printed in 1984.

A little poetry book:

  • The Sky Stays Behind. By: Gary Hotham, copyright in 2000.

One small book on display contains one page between the front and back covers:

  • A Sunday in Monterey: Woodcuts. By: Antonio Frasconi. Printed in 1964.

An interesting book of Psalms from the Bible was printed by the heirs and successors of Andrew Anderson in 1698:

  • The Psalms of David in metre: Newly translated, and diligently compared with the original text, and former translations…/ Allowed by the authority of the General Assembly of the Kirk of Scotland, and appointed to be sung in congregations and families.

This blog entry is prepared by Amy Yates with assistance from Elaine Chen.


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