Linda McLaury's blog

January Exhibits

 

 

 

For more information about exhibits at Rod Library see our exhibits web page.


Change in Renewal Policy

You asked, we listened. Stacks materials and Government Documents that previously checked out for 3 weeks with weekly renewals will now check out for 3 weeks with 3 week renewals until the end of the semester for undergraduate students. Material is still subject to recall. If another patron has an item you need just stop by the Circulation desk and ask that a hold be placed.


UNI Hunger Games

Hunger Games Countdown

It's easy to read about the Hunger Games, but can you actually survive the Hunger Games? Bring your blood-lust and your team to Rod Library on March 2, 2012, from 7 pm - Midnight and find out.


December Exhibits

 

 

 

 

 For more information about exhibits at Rod Library see our exhibits web page.


November 2011 Exhibits

 

 

For more information about exhibits at Rod Library see our exhibits web page.


September 2011 Exhibits

For more information about exhibits at Rod Library see our exhibits web page.


October 2011 Exhibits in Special Collections

For more information about exhibits at Rod Library see our exhibits web page.


October 2011 Exhibits

For more information about exhibits at Rod Library see our exhibits web page.


Faculty and Staff Library Fines

UNI has recently implemented a new Student Information System (SIS.)  When the old information was migrated into the new SIS system, faculty and staff with outstanding fees attached to their University bill were notified via e-mail.  Some of these fees include library fines.  Because the old system did not notify faculty and staff of outstanding fees of less than $20 it is possible this recent email is the first time you have been informed of a library fine on your account.  If you have any questions about a recent "Library Fine" on your account please contact the Circulation desk at 319-273-2462.


Veteran's Day, Armistice Day, and Remembrance Day

Come and Visit University Archives and Special Collections' two exhibits located on the 3rd floor in Rod Library. 

1. Veteran’s Day, Armistice Day, and Remembrance Day Exhibits
Prepared by: Amy Yates, photos by Elaine Chen

Armistice Day, also known as Remembrance Day and Veterans Day, is celebrated on November 11 for the purpose of commemorating the armistice, an agreement for the cessation of hostilities, which was signed between the Allies of World War I and Germany at Compiègne, France. The armistice took effect, the eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month of 1918.

The United States along with many other nations, declared this date a national holiday to commemorate those members of the armed forces who were killed in wartime.

President Woodrow Wilson first proclaimed an Armistice Day for November 11, 1919. In proclaiming the holiday, he said:

"To us in America, the reflections of Armistice Day will be filled with solemn pride in the heroism of those who died in the country's service and with gratitude for the victory, both because of the thing from which it has freed us and because of the opportunity it has given America to show her sympathy with peace and justice in the councils of the nations."

The United States Congress passed a concurrent resolution seven years later on June 4, 1926, requesting that the President (Calvin Coolidge this time) issue another proclamation to observe November 11 with appropriate ceremonies. An Act (52 Stat. 351; 5 U.S. Code, Sec. 87a) approved May 13, 1938, made the 11th of November in each year a legal holiday; "a day to be dedicated to the cause of world peace and to be thereafter celebrated and known as 'Armistice Day'." Across the world, many nations take a two-minute moment of silence at 11:00 a.m. as a sign of respect for the millions of people who died in the war.

In 1953, an Emporia, Kansas shoe store owner named Alfred King felt that Armistice Day should celebrate all veterans, not just those who served in World War I. King actively pushed for renaming and repurposing the holiday. With the help of Kansas Senator Ed Rees, a bill for the holiday was pushed through Congress and President Dwight Eisenhower signed it into law on May 26, 1954. Congress amended this act on June 1, 1954, replacing "Armistice" with Veterans. It has been known as Veterans Day since that time.

For countries of the British Commonwealth of Nations, the holiday was renamed Remembrance Day.

2. Famous UNI Alumni
Prepared by: David Glime, Julie Herrig, and Kim Nurre; photos by Elaine Chen

 

Senator Charles Grassley

  • Born 1933 in New Hartford, Iowa
  • Farmed and worked at Rath Packing
  • B. A. 1955, M. A. 1956
  • Elected to the United States House of Representatives in 1974.
  • Elected to the United States Senate in 1980.
  • Donated papers documenting his public life to UNI in the early 1980’s
  • One of only twenty-eight (28) other senators to cast 10,000 votes in the United States Senate.
  • Elected to the Iowa House of Representatives in 1958 from Butler County.
  • Maintains the longest consecutive voting record among current Senators.

Senator Charles Grassley won re-election to his sixth term in the U. S. Senate on November 2, 2010.

 Committee Assignments:

  • Committee on Finance; most senior Republican member.
  • Committee on the Judiciary; Senior member and has served since 1980.
  • Committee on Agriculture, nutrition and forestry; only active farmer serving.
  • Committee on the Budget; senior member.
  • Joint Committee on Taxation; made up of five senators from the Finance committee and five Representatives from the Committee on Ways and Means.

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